Growing Garlic

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
        P P            

(Best months for growing Garlic in New Zealand - cool/mountain regions)

P = Plant cloves

  • Easy to grow. Plant cloves. Best planted at soil temperatures between 10°C and 35°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 10 - 12 cm apart
  • Harvest in 17-25 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Beets, Carrots, Cucumbers, Dill, Tomatoes, Parsnips
  • Avoid growing close to: Asparagus, Beans, Brassicas, Peas, Potatoes
  • Almost ready to harvest
  • Garlic cloves
  • Young garlic shoots

Garlic is traditionally planted in cold weather and harvested in summer ("plant on the shortest day, harvest on the longest"). Plant the cloves (separated from the bulb), point upwards, deep enough to just cover with soil. A fairly tough and easy-growing plant but in better soil with regular watering you will get a better crop. On poorer soil, and forgetting to water them, you will still get some garlic, only not quite so much, maybe just a single large bulb.

Leave a garlic to go to seed, and you will probably get plenty of self-sown plants the following year.

To keep for later use, dig up and leave to dry out for a day or so after the green shoots die down. To use immediately, pull up a head when you need it, or cut and use the green shoots.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Garlic

Cut the growing shoots or use the entire young garlic plants as 'garlic greens' in stir-fry.

Your comments and tips

25 Nov 20, Koos (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
When can i plant garlick in gauten and what vaiarety im in springs
26 Nov 20, (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Check the planting calendar at top of the page. Check internet for varieties sold in South Africa.
07 Nov 20, Cici (USA - Zone 6a climate)
Other advise different from this is you can't just dry garlic for a day. Should be 2-3 weeks in shade with plenty of air circulation. Only way it will keep for 6-12 months depending on variety. I hang mine in an open shed/barn. Then trim off leaves and roots and store in cool dry place for long term storage.
09 Nov 20, Anonymous (USA - Zone 9b climate)
You could dig up and dry for a day, but in storing them put them in an open tray only one bulb/clump deep. Don't store in a big clump - they will sweat and rot. Your suggestion is pretty spot on. I pull my shallot bulbs out and leave them in the sun for a week or two. Trim the top off and put them in a tray 40mm x 60mm about 50cm deep. Store in the shade so they have air flow around them.
20 Oct 20, Edwin Kruger (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Can i start planting garlic in Oct to Nov ?
20 Oct 20, Liz (New Zealand - temperate climate)
It is too late in the year for your climate. Check the garlic page under your climate zone.
02 Sep 20, Lawrence (South Africa - Dry summer sub-tropical climate)
Can i plant in September im in port elizabeth
03 Sep 20, Anon (South Africa - Humid sub-tropical climate)
You can plant it but you probably won't grow a crop, reason, it is the wrong season. Check and do as the planting calendar say at the top of the page.
29 Aug 20, Karen Mirikitani (USA - Zone 11b climate)
When do you add grass cuttings or dead leaves to the garden bed when growing garlic?
31 Aug 20, Anonymous (USA - Zone 3b climate)
Work out if adding to the soil or as a mulch. Google it then.
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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. GardenGrow is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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